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Knitter's Handy Book Of Sweater Patterns Basic Designs in Multiple Sizes and Gauges

This book was created for knitters who want standard sweater patterns in a variety of sizes and gauges, as well as those who want a template from which to develop their own design ideas.
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Description

Both a pattern book and a reference book, The Knitter's Handy Book Of Sweater Patterns has been created for knitters who want standard sweater patterns in a variety of sizes and gauges, as well as those who want a template from which to develop their own design ideas.

This sequel to the phenomenal bestseller The Knitter's Handy Book of Patterns, presents easy-to-follow charted instructions for eighteen sweaters, three in each of the six most popular sweater constructions: drop shoulder, modified drop shoulder, set-in sleeve, saddle shoulder, raglan, and seamless yoke. Each style is provided in fifteen sizes (in two-inch graduations) from a 26-inch chest circumference for a two-year-old child to a 54-inch chest circumference for a large adult. Each size is further divided into six possible gauges: 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7 stitches per inch. If you're counting, that's 75 options for each of the six styles, or 450 patterns in all (all with yarn yardage estimates). Add the cardigan and neckline variations, and you've got more than 1,000 patterns! Even more variations are possible by adding different neck finishes, edgings, waist shapings, and color or stitch patterns.

Detailed diagrams for finished dimensions are included, along with a glossary of techniques and a chapter on design considerations. If knitting sweaters is your passion, look no further-this book is your definitive resource.

A note from Ann Budd, Author of The Knitter's Handy Book of Sweater Patterns:

Ann Budd

Ann Budd - Master Knitter, Reluctant Model

This is not your standard sweater pattern book, though you’ll find detailed instructions for eighteen designs. Nor is this a design book, though it will guide you through creating the sweater of your choice in the yarn of your choice.
This book offers instructions for the six most common sweater constructions— drop shoulder, modified drop shoulder, set-in sleeve, saddle shoulder, raglan, and seamless yoke.

Each style is provided in fifteen sizes, in 2" (5-cm) increments from a 26" (66 cm) chest circumference appropriate for a child to a 54" (137 cm) chest circumference appropriate for a large adult. And each size is given in five possible gauges—3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 stitches per inch. That’s a whopping 75 options for each of the six styles, or 450 patterns in all! Add the cardigan versions and you’ve got 900 possibilities, without counting neckline, edging, color, and stitch pattern variations.

The six sweater styles in this book differ in the way that the sleeves join the body. The first four styles are made by knitting the sweater pieces separately—one back, one or two front(s), and two sleeves. In general, the pieces are knitted back and forth in rows (though some designers have methods for working them in the round). The other two styles are worked in the round from the bottom up. The body is worked as a tube from the lower edge to the armholes, the sleeves are also worked as tubes to the armhole, the sleeves and body are joined, and the yoke is worked in a single piece to the neck.

The simplest style, the drop shoulder, consists of a rectangle for the front, another rectangle for the back, and two trapezoids for the sleeves. There is no armhole shaping and the tops of the sleeves are sewn directly onto the side edges above the marked armhole positions.

The modified drop-shoulder style uses rudimentary shaping to eliminate some excess width at the upper body above the armholes. Stitches are bound off at the base of each armhole on the front and back to form notches that accommodate the upper sleeves.

Set-in sleeve sweaters have the most tailored fit. Both the upper body and the tops of the sleeves are shaped to eliminate excess fabric at the armholes. On a well-fitting set-in-sleeve sweater, the armholes fall directly in line with the shoulder bone without pulling or puckering.

The saddle shoulder sweater in this book is closely related to the set-in-sleeve style (though other sweater styles can also have saddles). The difference between the two lies in the “saddle,” an extension of the sleeve top, from the armhole to the neck.

The raglan style in this book is worked in the round. For the in-the-round method, the body and sleeves are each worked as tubes from the lower edge to the armholes, then joined for the yoke, which is also worked in the round to the neck. The yoke is shaped by decreases worked along four diagonal lines (two each on the front and back) that extend from armhole to neck.

Seamless yoke sweaters are worked in the round, as the raglan style, but the yoke is shaped by decreases that are placed evenly around the circumference of the yoke.


Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction
Drop-Shoulder Sweaters
Child Sizes
Adult Sizes
Copy Cats
Modified Drop-Shoulder Sweaters
Child Sizes
Adult Sizes
Copy Cats
Set-In Sleeve Sweaters
Child Sizes
Adult Sizes
Copy Cats
Saddle-Shoulder Sweaters
Child Sizes
Adult Sizes
Copy Cats
Raglan Sweaters
Child Sizes
Adult Sizes
Copy Cats
Seamless Yoke Sweaters
Child Sizes
Adult Sizes
Copy Cats
Expanding Your Options
Glossary
Abbreviations
Yarn Sources
Index

SKU: 04KN1

Author/Speaker/Editor: Ann Budd

Format: Hardcover

ISBN 13: 9781931499439

Number Of Pages: 224

About the Author

Ann Budd, managing editor of Interweave Knits, learned to knit in 1968 in Switzerland, when all girls in the public school system were taught needle arts. After returning to the States, she continued to knit as a hobby while working towards a Master's Degree in Geology. In 1989, Ann left geology to pursue her love of fibers and began working for Interweave Press, first for Handwoven magazine, then in the book department, and finally for Interweave Knits magazine, which has featured many of her projects and articles. In 2000, Ann was awarded the Master Knitter certificate from The Knitting Guild of America. Ann lives in Boulder, Colorado, with her husband and three sons, who accept- but do not share!-her passion for knitting

Details

"Get this. If you ever make sweaters, it’s absolutely fabulous. You could knit for your entire life out of this one book and a stitch dictionary. It’s great! If you ever knit sweaters at all, this is definitely a book you’re going to want. Especially if you have ever felt the urge to design your own sweater, but weren’t sure where to start, or were intimidated by the math." -- KnittingScholar.com

"With this book, if you can dream it you can knit it." -- Planet Purl

"This is a particularly valuable resource for the experienced knitter…. If you are an experienced knitter and sweater maker, you will love this book. This could easily be the last sweater pattern book you will buy." -- Shuttle, Spindle & Dyepot

SKU: 04KN1

Author/Speaker/Editor: Ann Budd

Format: Hardcover

ISBN 13: 9781931499439

Number Of Pages: 224

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Customer Reviews

Design your own sweaters Review by Kate
Rating

I bought this book a couple of years ago and have used it over and over - for sweaters for my kids, my husband and myself. It is so versatile. I hate to religiously follow patterns. I like to make up my own designs, but lack advanced design tools. This reference (not really a book) tells you exactly how to convert your ideas into sweaters, whether it's a fine gauge summer top or a bulky winter jacket. Also, I don't like to sew seams, so the raglan and yoke designs that minimize seaming are perfect.

(Posted on 11/4/2014)

(Posted on 11/4/2014)

Knitter's Handy Book Of Sweater Patterns: Basic Designs in Multiple Sizes and Gauges Review by Ute Willmore

I bought this book years ago and it's been a great help. I often find patterns I like but either the size I need is not included or the yarn used in the pattern is thicker than I want to use. I wear a size 2XL and pattern in that size are not easy to find. The Knitter's Handy Book of Sweater Patterns has helped me many times to increase the pattern to the size I need. I just look up the pattern closest to the design in my pattern and find the correct yarn and gauge. That will give me a starting point for the number of stitches per row I will need. Things get more complicated if the stitch pattern in my pattern has a different gauge than stockinette stitch, but many patterns work out without any further calculations. Since I am rather large I prefer sweaters, cardigans and vest (waist coats) made with thinner yarn, size 3 usually, but patterns for adult sized tops using a thin yarn are hard to find too. Most patterns call for worsted weight or thicker yarn which is just to warm for me and also makes me look even bigger than I am. Again, Knitter's Handy Book Of Sweater Patterns solves the problem for me and quickly too. I just look for a similar pattern and look up the instructions for that pattern in a different gauge. As always, a cable stitch pattern or other stitch pattern with a different gauge than stockinette stitch pattern will require a few more adjustments, but I always have at least a starting point. The book has been a great help to me and I highly recommend it. The only thing missing, IMHO, are patterns that use stitch patterns that don't match the gauge of the stockinette pattern and instructions for adjusting the basic patterns in the book to include some of these stitch patterns. For example: It would be nice if the book included instructions for adjusting the number of stitches per row when adding a cable or lace pannel to the basic pattern. Adding instructions that explain how to calculate the number of stitches needed to adjust the basic pattern when adding a cable, lattice work, or lace panel to any pattern would complete the "Knitter's Handy Book Of Sweater Patterns: Basic Designs in Multiple Sizes and Gauges", making it a priceless and must-have resource for knitters of all skill levels.

(Posted on 2/7/2012)

(Posted on 2/7/2012)

A great tool! Review by Kim D'Angelo

This book has helped me figure out gauge and design issues. I am now designing my own patterns based on the knowledge I have aquired. I have recommended this book several times already. A must have for all, especially those who can never take a pattern at face value, but just have to add something of their own to it, like me!

(Posted on 11/11/2011)

(Posted on 11/11/2011)

At Last Review by Paulette Povey

For a long time, I've been needing this book. My grandchildren request sweaters with pictures on them. So I don't have a pattern, and have to make my own. This book takes a lot of guessing out of the shaping. I recommend it to anyone who wants to make their own design.

(Posted on 11/10/2011)

(Posted on 11/10/2011)